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    Ohio College Moving Forward With Plans To Operate A Medical Cannabis Test Lab

    By OhioCannabis

        CCV Research Press Release   Ohio College moving forward with plans to operate a medical cannabis test lab Internal planning moving fast with Press Conference scheduled for Sept 5th.   Cleveland, Ohio Aug 15, 2017   CCV Research provided an update today regarding its efforts to help assist an Ohio Public Institute of Higher Education to successfully obtain a certificate of operation for the Ohio Department of Commerce to operate a medical cannabis test lab.  CCV met with the college executive team last week to review the current challenges and opportunities to support this state mandated testing and the workforce development effort needed to protect public safety.  “It was important that we advise the executive team that lab licensure is not a mechanism for a private company to partner with the college to beat out other companies,” stated Dr. Jonathan Cachat, President and CEO of CCV Research.  “In turn, the executive team disclosed a vision for a long-term plan to develop a robust lab technician program across multiple disciplines.  They indicated that the cannabis test lab is just a part of the overall workforce development program. “ Last week, CCV Research announced a completed letter of intent with the Ohio institution in part to ease concerns of Ohio patients, cannabis businesses and state regulators that no eligible colleges were willing to participate. The concern is that this critical step in the supply chain would not be met and the entire program would experience delay. State regulators have addressed this trepidation by suggesting that the law (HB 523) and/or testing lab regulations could be changed before launch to allow privately-owned companies to apply. However, CCV Research and other industry experts have been passionately advocating for institutes of higher education to participate in legal cannabis analytics & research for years. As reported by Jimi Devine of Cannabis Now,  “While a surprise inclusion for some, public universities taking part in state cannabis programs made perfect sense to long time UC Berkeley cannabis researcher Dr. Amanda Reiman, who currently serves on the board of the International Cannabis Growers Association.  “I think that the involvement of universities in the testing of cannabis for state programs makes total sense,” Reiman said. “Universities and colleges are often on the forefront of research and public discourse. Federal funding used to be a huge barrier for these institutions wanting to get involved in this way. But, more and more, state medical cannabis laws are including these institutions as a vital part of their program. I think this is a move in the right direction.” “For all the flack state regulators have been getting during the rule making process, Ohio did get this right,” Dr. Cachat explained. “By placing the analytic testing in the hands of public institutes, Ohio has opened the door for significant life-saving medical breakthroughs, deeply needed workforce development opportunities and eliminated the risks of lab-shopping.” Apparently, ‘lab shopping’ is a substantial problem in mature legal cannabis markets with privately-owned labs wherein cultivators or producers will select the lab that tests their products based on a pre-determined, desired result. Want to boost up your flowers THC levels, go to Lab X – they always over estimate; afraid that you have a minor powdery mildew problem, get tested at Lab Y who never fails anyone for fungal diseases. “There is still concern about loss of federal funding.  However, as a public Ohio college, we feel empowered to support the state and Ohio patients with quality and safety assurance, and obligated to provide education and workforce development opportunities,” stated an unnamed college representative.  “We are waiting until Sept 5 to formally announce our involvement, to assure support from our community and develop an application that has a high probability of success.  We are also aware of a potential capacity problems and are reviewing ways to increase testing capacity by means of satellite lab facilities located across the state in cooperation with other Ohio public institutes of higher education allowed by the law.” Any members of the press that would like to be invited to the Sept 5 Press Conference are to send a request to the media contact below.   ABOUT CCV RESEARCH CCV Research is an innovative development & management group specializing in the cannabis industry with expertise in the entire cannabis supply chain, and regarding state and local regulation creation and deployment.  Founded by Dr. Jonathan Cachat, recognized as one of the brightest mind in the cannabis industry, the CCV Research Team bring investment, merger / acquisition, business processes for compliance including ISO 9000 and ISO 17025, and business startup expertise. Media Contact John M. Cachat 440-941-2721 john@ccvresearch.com  
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  • OhioCannabis

    185 total submissions for the 24 Ohio Medical Marijuana Cultivation Licenses

    By OhioCannabis

    185 total submissions for the 24 Ohio Medical Marijuana Cultivation Licenses   Ohio has received a total of 185 applications for the 24 Tier I & Tier II licenses to grow cannabis under the Ohio State’s new Medical Marijuana Program.  The Ohio Commerce Department has released the business names, contact names and desired licenses of the applicants, but not their proposed locations or any other details yet.  This list doesn't include names of the principals or investors backing each proposal or locations where the applicants want to grow. The department has declined to release further application information at this time. Republican Gov. John Kasich signed a law more than a year ago in June of 2016, allowing medical marijuana to be prescribed under 20 certain conditions to patients suffering one or more of these qualifying medical conditions. The Ohio Department of Commerce released a list of 185 applicants for medical marijuana cultivator licenses for both Tier I & Tier II. The application deadline for Ohio’s 24 licenses was Friday, June 30th 2017. There were 109 submissions for the 12 "Tier I" Cultivation Licenses.  Each license allows the facility to grow medical marijuana in up to, 25,000 square feet of space.  The application fee for Tier I was $20,000 with the annual license fee being $180,000.  The Ohio State Medical Marijuana Program also received 76 submissions for the 12 "Tier II" Cultivation Licenses that will also be awarded.  Each Tier II License allows for up to, 3,000 square feet of growing space and Tier II application fee was $2,000 with an annual license fee of $18,000. It will also license 40 processors that will make marijuana oils, tinctures, patches and edible products allowed by law, 60 dispensaries and an unknown number of testing labs.  Ohio will award cultivator licenses based on a 100 point system focusing on how their businesses plans will grow cannabis, staff and secure their facilities and comply with state regulations and also if they have any past industry experience. Three companies – ICann Consulting of Ohio, B&B Grow Solutions of Illinois and Meade & Wing of Arizona – will assist state MMJ regulators in scoring the applications, according to the Dispatch. Applications will be judged on criteria that include finances, operations and security. The estimated cost of opening a facility runs from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of millions. Yet that hasn’t deterred local business owners, minorities or investors from California to Pennsylvania from applying.  Looking at the list there seems to be quite a few of investors from outside of Ohio, a major thorn in the side of Ohio's application process.  Having some of the biggest backlash from the citizens of Ohio who demanded that being an Ohio resident was a requirement to obtaining an Ohio Medical Marijuana License.  But sadly this seems to have fallen on deaf, Ohio legislator ears.  With so much at stake, groups have scouted medical professors and hired seasoned consultants to boost their chances.  Though many are keeping quiet right now as they did not want to jeopardize their applications. Ohio’s marijuana program stipulates that 15 percent of licenses must go to a minority-owned group — black, Hispanic, Asian or Native American. Legal experts have questioned whether the quota would stand in court, though no legal challenge has been filed to date. As soon as any more information is known we will update you as soon as possible.  Once some of the licensee holders are announced, we will also get you some behind the scenes interviews and more with them! Stay tuned! OhioCannabis.com Here is the link to view the PDF of the 185 submissions: Cultivator Application Information Release.pdf  
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Our community blogs

  1.  

    ccv.png.6e14fcc6242da87abcb0b64c6f4a001e.png  CCV Research Press Release

     

    Ohio College moving forward with plans to operate a medical cannabis test lab

    Internal planning moving fast with Press Conference scheduled for Sept 5th.

     

    Cleveland, Ohio Aug 15, 2017   CCV Research provided an update today regarding its efforts to help assist an Ohio Public Institute of Higher Education to successfully obtain a certificate of operation for the Ohio Department of Commerce to operate a medical cannabis test lab.  CCV met with the college executive team last week to review the current challenges and opportunities to support this state mandated testing and the workforce development effort needed to protect public safety. 

    “It was important that we advise the executive team that lab licensure is not a mechanism for a private company to partner with the college to beat out other companies,” stated Dr. Jonathan Cachat, President and CEO of CCV Research.  “In turn, the executive team disclosed a vision for a long-term plan to develop a robust lab technician program across multiple disciplines.  They indicated that the cannabis test lab is just a part of the overall workforce development program. “

    Last week, CCV Research announced a completed letter of intent with the Ohio institution in part to ease concerns of Ohio patients, cannabis businesses and state regulators that no eligible colleges were willing to participate. The concern is that this critical step in the supply chain would not be met and the entire program would experience delay. State regulators have addressed this trepidation by suggesting that the law (HB 523) and/or testing lab regulations could be changed before launch to allow privately-owned companies to apply. However, CCV Research and other industry experts have been passionately advocating for institutes of higher education to participate in legal cannabis analytics & research for years.

    As reported by Jimi Devine of Cannabis Now,  “While a surprise inclusion for some, public universities taking part in state cannabis programs made perfect sense to long time UC Berkeley cannabis researcher Dr. Amanda Reiman, who currently serves on the board of the International Cannabis Growers Association.  “I think that the involvement of universities in the testing of cannabis for state programs makes total sense,” Reiman said. “Universities and colleges are often on the forefront of research and public discourse. Federal funding used to be a huge barrier for these institutions wanting to get involved in this way. But, more and more, state medical cannabis laws are including these institutions as a vital part of their program. I think this is a move in the right direction.”

    “For all the flack state regulators have been getting during the rule making process, Ohio did get this right,” Dr. Cachat explained. “By placing the analytic testing in the hands of public institutes, Ohio has opened the door for significant life-saving medical breakthroughs, deeply needed workforce development opportunities and eliminated the risks of lab-shopping.” Apparently, ‘lab shopping’ is a substantial problem in mature legal cannabis markets with privately-owned labs wherein cultivators or producers will select the lab that tests their products based on a pre-determined, desired result. Want to boost up your flowers THC levels, go to Lab X – they always over estimate; afraid that you have a minor powdery mildew problem, get tested at Lab Y who never fails anyone for fungal diseases.

    “There is still concern about loss of federal funding.  However, as a public Ohio college, we feel empowered to support the state and Ohio patients with quality and safety assurance, and obligated to provide education and workforce development opportunities,” stated an unnamed college representative.  “We are waiting until Sept 5 to formally announce our involvement, to assure support from our community and develop an application that has a high probability of success.  We are also aware of a potential capacity problems and are reviewing ways to increase testing capacity by means of satellite lab facilities located across the state in cooperation with other Ohio public institutes of higher education allowed by the law.”

    Any members of the press that would like to be invited to the Sept 5 Press Conference are to send a request to the media contact below.

     

    ABOUT CCV RESEARCH

    CCV Research is an innovative development & management group specializing in the cannabis industry with expertise in the entire cannabis supply chain, and regarding state and local regulation creation and deployment.  Founded by Dr. Jonathan Cachat, recognized as one of the brightest mind in the cannabis industry, the CCV Research Team bring investment, merger / acquisition, business processes for compliance including ISO 9000 and ISO 17025, and business startup expertise.

    Media Contact

    John M. Cachat

    440-941-2721

    john@ccvresearch.com

     

  2.  

    So, you’ve decided to try marijuana for the first time. Even better, you’ve decided to vaporize it. Smoking cannabis is the most popular way to consume it, but by vaping your cannabis you are getting more of those wanted cannabinoids. To ensure that you have the best experience possible, we’ve prepared a few tips. Follow these and you’ll have a better experience for your first time.

    1. Where Do You Get Your Marijuana?

    If you live in Washington, Alaska, Oregon, Colorado, California, Nevada, Massachusetts, or Maine and you are 21 years of age, you can go to your local marijuana dispensary and buy it. Non-residents can travel to these states, but there are laws governing the amount that can be purchased. If you live in a medical marijuana state, as long as you have your medical marijuana card, you can purchase it at a medical dispensary.  Remember, purchasing it is still illegal if you don’t live in one of these states.

    2. Create A Comfortable Space

    You definitely don’t want to be on edge when you’re smoking up for the first time. Constantly being worried about getting caught will just bring you down. So, go somewhere you’re comfortable. Bring some music – either an iPod, MP3 player, or other means of playing music. You might also want to bring a friend or two. It’s better if they’re veterans and not also noobs. Make sure you’re not going to be disturbed for a bit.

    3. Plan Your Vaping Sessions Around Mealtime

    The munchies are real. When you smoke or vape marijuana, you will probably start to feel hungry. What’s bad about this is that you tend to crave the worst foods possible during a smoke session – chips, candy, sweets, and fast food. For this reason, planning your first-time vape session around a mealtime can ensure that your munchies are taken care of by a meal. Preferably a balanced one with healthy ingredients and not fast food.   

    4. Smoking or Edibles For the First Time

    Honestly, it is recommended that you smoke or vape your weed the first time.  Eating a cannabis infused brownie takes time before the effects set in. Edibles also have a significantly stronger effect than smoked or vaporized marijuana. If you do decide to eat an edible, give it time to kick in before chowing down on that other brownie because you don’t feel anything. We recommend waiting at least an hour.

    If you decide to vape, make sure that you have the appropriate vaporizer for your chosen cannabis – vape pens and mods are typically made specifically for dry herbs, oils, or concentrates. Make sure that you’re using the correct tank/cartridge if you’ve purchased a vape that is a 3-in-1 model.   

    5. Cannabis Strain Recommendations

    Depending on what you want to feel, your cannabis strain selection might vary. If you want the cerebral high that offers a boost to creativity – choose a sativa. If you prefer the body high and want to feel relaxed and possibly sleepy – choose an indica. If you want a balanced high – choose a hybrid of the two. Talk to the employees at the dispensary and tell them what kind of high you want. They should be able to point out a good strain for you.

    6. Dosing

    If it is your very first time, take one or two puffs. This is all that it should take for a first timer to feel the effects of marijuana. If you do not feel anything – give it about 20 minutes. If you are still not feeling anything – take another puff or two.  

    7. Vaporizing Temperatures for Cannabis

    The ideal temperature for vaporizing your marijuana is 175 – 200°C (347 – 392°F). Lower temperatures release fewer cannabinoids and are ideal for those who want a more awake high. Go much higher than 400 degrees and you risk combusting your cannabinoids – meaning you won’t get them.   

    8. How Long Will The High Last?

    You can expect your high to last between 2 to 4 hours. Edibles will produce a longer lasting high that might be more intense. Differing strains will also affect the length of your high. Because it can be unpredictable, make sure that you don’t have anywhere you have to be.

    9. What Should You Expect to Feel The First Time?

    Your mouth will get dry. You will feel hungry. Time perception alters – you may feel that time is passing more slowly. Also, this will also depend greatly on which strain you’ve chosen - discussed above – and your overall mood when you smoke. The amount you smoke will also affect this.

    10. Do Not Smoke In Public Places

    Even if you live in a legalized recreational state, there are still laws against smoking in public places. So, for this reason, make sure that you are at a private residence for your first smoke session.

    There they are. Our ten tips for first-time marijuana smokers – or vapers. From where to get it to how much to smoke to the best vaping temperature, we hope to have answered some of your questions about your first time. Now just sit back and enjoy the feeling!

     

    Author

    Michael is a marketing and creative content specialist at GotVape.com with primary focus on customer satisfaction. Technology and fitness combined healthy lifestyle obsession are his main talking points.

  3. Hey Canna Friendly Friends,

    It’s been awhile but I have not stopped grinding on the cause we all know and love, the legalization effort of that Mary Jane. Some big things have been happening that will be revealed throughout the summer so be sure to stay tuned.

    We hit our unofficial holiday this week and I hope everyone had a fantastic 4/20. On 4/21 I was still blazing at the Vortex show Still B?lazin with Akron Kent Norml and some ganja friendly artists that happened to play. I set up shop for Weed Be Better Off with Alliances new and favorite smoke shop Cali Cultures  store owner Josh Joseph as musicians and Akronites piled into a smokey Vortex.

    The crowd was of the smaller scale and the stage was lit as artists like North Coast Shakedown and Tha Grimey Onez performed unique sets that everyone could dance to.

    Other than making a presence known and promoting Cali Cultures grand opening ( shameless plug: which will be on April 29th at 4pm in Alliance Ohio ), I was there to speak Akron Kent Norml leader, Jolie Townsend about the decrim movement that is setting up shop in Akron.

    When I asked her why we should decrim, she said, “Decriminalization at the local level is the first step to sensible marijuana reform. Here in Akron, we have decided to do a citizen's initiative to reduce all penalties for misdemeanor level offenses." She went on to tell me her main reasons why she thinks decrim is absolutely necessary for our community:

    Jolie’s reasons to decrim:

    Resources could be better used on other projects within the city

    Provide patients with the ability to legally grow,
    possess and use their own medicine

    Allows law enforcement to devote resources to more serious crime

    Stops making criminals out of marijuana users

    Saves the city $$$

    According to Jolie, it costs 9× more to process a conviction for a misdemeanor offense than they receive in fines. Blacks are 4× more likely to be arrested is a national average and unfortunately in Akron, that jumps up to 8× more likely to be arrested.

    Obviously everyone reading this can see exactly why we need reform. Akron Kent Norml has an action meeting coming up for people that are interested in volunteering Wednesday April 26th, 2017. You can find more information about that on their Facebook event page here:

    https://www.facebook.com/events/1412820268825925/?ti=cl

    I must admit, I was a little disappointed that there were not enough contestants for the 420 Beauty Pageant. Which brings me to my point that I would love to see some more female canna supporters participating in some 420 friendly events in the future.

    Overall, it was an okay event and I look forward to working with Akron Kent Norml more in the future.

    I’m very excited to see more canna themed events popping up throughout the Buckeye state and cannot wait for the OhioCannabis.com show that will be occurring May 27th and 28th at the Columbus Convention Center. You can find out more information about this event by visiting: http://bit.ly/2pVcxd0

    Until Next Time, Stay Pushing

    Tia Marie Trees

    About The Blogger: Tia Marie Trees is an Ohio native that shares a passion for writing, acting, and gardening. She is a mother and a friend and contributes pieces to several publications besides OhioCannabis.com including HelloComfyTree.com and WeedBeBetterOff.com. You can find her on FB at: www.facebook.com/TiaMarieTrees or on IG at InfiniteMediaTia

     

  4. This article was written for us by the Mesothelioma.net project:

    Those who are suffering from mesothelioma often feel as if they don’t have any hope. This aggressive form of cancer is a disease that spreads quite rapidly, can’t be diagnosed until it has settled into the body and is hard to treat. There is almost no chance of a remission or cure of this disease. In the modern era, many people are starting to seek treatment from alternative therapies in the hopes of getting better treatment and a relief from the unpleasant symptoms of cancer.

    One of the most popular alternatives for persons suffering from cancer and other painful and chronic disease is medical marijuana. The District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and twenty-eight US states have decreed that "Mary Jane" is legal for medical purposes. Although the federal government still has not legalized cannabis, the statewide expansion of medical marijuana is looking very promising for cancer patients.

    "MJ" is a drug that is gleaned from a plant called cannabis. This plant originated in Asia, but is now grown all over the world. There is a resin in the plant that contains compounds called cannabinoids. These compounds are psychoactive, which means that they act on the central nervous system and can affect both the mood and consciousness. For decades, the cannabis plant has been in high demand for spiritual, medicinal and recreational purposes. In the United States, marijuana is still a schedule I controlled substance, which means that by federal law it is illegal for any type of use. As mentioned above, however, there are many states where the drug can be taken under strictly regulated circumstances.

    Currently, there are two prescription drugs that have been created based on the way that cannabinoids react in the body and are available to patients in states where cannabis for medicinal purposes is legal. One is Dronabinol, which is typically prescribed to persons in order to treat vomiting and nausea that results from chemotherapy. It is also given to AIDS and HIV patients to assist in the reversing of weight loss and improving appetite. The other drug is called Nabilone. It is used for similar ailments as Dronabinol, but is considerably stronger and is more of a last resort.

    A life with cancer is very stressful. Frequently, cancer patients suffer from emotional distress, depression, anxiety and sleep problems. Cannabinoids have been shown to be quite useful at reversing these problems. In animal studies, cannabinoids have been shown to have a solid anti-anxiety effect.

  5. Make Your Voice Heard Regarding Ohio Medical Marijuana House Bill 523!

    We at OhioCannabis.com stand STRONGLY with our new partner - The Ohio Cannabis Institute and have formed a NEW voice for all Ohioans to help make change happen NOW!  Visit CompassionateOhio.org to have your voice heard & PLEASE share this video and message with everyone you know to help get this movement off the ground!

     

     

  6.  

    cannabizbootcamplogo.png

     

     

     

     

     

    Hello again OhioCannabis.com readers. It’s great to be writing to all of you again and I hope to hear more from my readers as the days go by.

     

    With all that lovey dovey stuff out of the way, we can talk business or rather “CannaBiz Bootcamp”. Over the weekend, I was able to get my bootcamp on with the Cannabiz Boot Camp Seminar that hit Cleveland, Ohio on October 1st & also in Columbus on Sunday October 2nd. The event was held at the Sheraton Hotel which was conveniently close to the Cleveland Hopkins airport. Training consisted of an “Industry Overview” presentation at a “theater style” audience of interested entrepreneurs and attendees. The presentation room was very intimate compared to most events I’ve attended and I really enjoyed the amount of individual attention guests were given during the training.

     

    In the back of the room, educational learning materials were on display for students which included books like, “Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana” and “The Little Black Book of Marijuana"Another table located in the back of the room displayed Cannabiz BootCamp Apparel.

     

    I arrived at the Sheraton a bit early with my OhioCannabis.com founder John & my partner Amanda, where we were able to catch a few words with CannaBizBootCamp Founder, Kathy Mason. Kathy is a fiery Canna Veteran that comes out of Nevada. Planning on a visit to Nevada in the near future to see Deep Roots Harvest with Weed Be Better, I was pretty interested in hearing her take on the industry model out there. She stated how Nevada's model, in her opinion, is set up completely wrong and Ohio should look to the structure of the Colorado model if it want’s to make it’s mark in the industry without all the hang-ups that other states are facing from “not well thought out legislation”.

     

    After we parted ways with Kathy, we went back downstairs where guests were arriving and checking in at a registration table outside the event. The seminar began promptly at 9:28 am and went through 11:30am.

     

    Since it was such an intimate venue, there was an brief opportunity for guests to go around the room, state their first name, and give a little bit of why they were there. Two things seemed to be the motivation for almost all attendees coming to the bootcamp. These two things were that they wanted to obtain general knowledge to begin their career in the cannabis industry and to get information for a loved one that was currently suffering from some ailment that they thought cannabis could help.

     

    The speaker, then began her introduction of what got her involved in the cannabis industry and a little bit about her background. She grew up in Missouri, two blocks from Ferguson, and has lived in “Monsanto country” as she calls it, ever since. After being inspired to get involved in the industry after seeing the impact cannabis had on the life of a sick family member, Tracey linked up with the Cannabiz team at a conference out in Oakland, California. After a lot of independent education and training, she was hired on as an educator and now tours the country speaking about the benefits of cannabis and hemp and giving event attendees a brief bootcamp run down on the history of cannabis, laws and regulations at a federal and state level, and career opportunities that are available.

     

    Once everyone got acquainted with her as an educator, Tracey got down to bootcamp business and gave us the introductory facts about the industry. This included an explanation of reefer madness, an insight into the endocannabinoid system, and some mind boggling statistics about the plant, like its worth per acre compared to corn. There were several graphs and charts included that were sourced from Marijuana Business Daily.com.

     

    After a brief break option, Tracey began her second part of the presentation which covered the hemp plant, state and federal regulations, and a rundown of cannabis non-profit groups like Women Grow and Norml. We were lucky enough to have a Ohio Central Norml Chapter representative in the crowd named Brandon Bashak, who agreed to be interviewed by the OhioCannnabis.com team. Brandon stated, “Potential cannaBiz owners in Ohio should start thinking about how we are going to give back to the community. We have to remember, that cannabis business owners in Ohio will be under intense scrutiny from Law Enforcement, the Media, and Lawmakers, so we have to remember to always conduct ourselves in a responsible, compassionate manner to reflect the beauty of the nature of our business. I like to look at what Steve DeAngelo has done with his Harborside Health Clinic in Oakland. After visiting, I was in awe of how much a medical cannabis dispensary can really provide to a community. All registered patient/members of Harborside may attend any of the free classes and programs sponsored but not limited to Reiki, Acupuncture, Hypnotherapy, Chiropractic, Grow Classes, Herbalist Consultations, Yoga, Naturopathy, Substance abuse treatment... the list goes on and on. That is what I call comprehensive holistic treatment. Now some more ideas that I would like to be seen put into practice are, sponsored organic community food/botanical gardens, organized volunteer teams for trash pickup feeding people, and adult league sports teams(if bars can do it, why not cannabis collectives). There are so many different ways we can reach out and improve our community the list is endless. It all starts with treating each other compassionately, and doing what we love.”

     

    When asked what he would like to tell Ohioans to do to continue supporting the cause he said, “I encourage Ohioans to get out to as many Cannabis related events as possible so that we can continue to network with others that all have a common interest. It is important that everyone looking to participate in this up and coming industry learn and love and grow with each other, so that we can all be on the same page. I cannot stress enough how important it is to stay educated in an industry that changes legality multiple times per day throughout the nation. The more we know the better off we all are to be able to help one another. Whether it be rallying together to get a petition signed to grant more patients safer access, or to come together to help someone afflicted with illness, it takes a community. I am proud to have such a great family, that is the cannabis community. Please support your local NORML chapter.”

     

    Tracey concluded her presentation by giving a deeper look into the opportunities available along with her “Jacket Flipper Philosophy”. As Retail, Cultivation, Ancillary, and Manufacturing businesses will touch every part of the Ohio economy, we will see a great growth in jobs as well as an economic boost for everyone. This is where the “Jacket Flipping” will come into play, as interested individuals who are already doing things like IT and Culinary, will pivot their skill set over into a new and emerging market. Almost everyone has experience in doing something, and they now have the opportunity to transfer that experience into helping the cannabis and hemp industry grow and prosper along with the means of their state.

     

    This was a very well thought out basic overview of the industry and I would recommend their course for anyone looking to get a brief summary of what this plant and the industry behind it entails.

     

    The only suggestions I would have for the BootCamp’s next training, would be to work on marketing the event a little bit more prior to coming. If I wasn’t an industry insider, I don’t think I would have heard about this event prior. I would also suggest following through with contests and promotions that are already included in your presentation. These will benefit you in the long run more than you might think. Overall though, I think they had great content and a great speaker and look forward to seeing them again. I would give this event a 3.75 Leaf Rating on the 5 Leaf Scale.

     

    They WILL be coming back to Ohio, specifically Cleveland & Columbus again soon - so stay tuned to OhioCannabis.com for up coming events.  If you’d like to get more information on the CannaBiz Bootcamp, feel free to visit their website at cannabizbootcamp.com

     

    We also recorded a lot of video and will be posting them up in the next few days once we edit everything, so stay tuned for that!

     

    Tia Marie Trees

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  7. Filtered Water via RO/DI

     

    Filtered Water is another crucial part of growing medical grade Organic Cannabis.

    There are so many impurities, chemicals and gunk in city tap water, that it really needs to be filtered to produced the highest quality medicine you can.

    If you are on well or spring water and have a very low TDS (total dissolved solids) then you probably don't need an RO/DI machine, but may require other types of filtration to remove odors or other issues your water may have.  We highly suggest having your well or spring water tested to know exactly what is in it before using it to grow medical grade cannabis.

    This article will only focus on residential RO/DI filters used primarily on city water.

     

    MPDI-90-600x600.png

     

    RO/DI stands for Reverse Osmosis De-Ionization.  It is the process of removing ALL impurities in your city water, bringing your TDS level down to ZERO!

    TDS stands for Total Dissolved Solids and can range from 1 to well over 1000ppm (Parts Per Million) and measures the amount of solids within your water via EC Electrical Conductivity.

    RO/DI units, like the one that are pictured above, are generally considered "residential" in their size & capacity & can do upwards of 200gpd depending on the unit you purchase.  You can buy much larger & more expensive commercial units that will produce a much larger water volume, ranging in the thousands of gallons per day.  But this particular piece will only focus on the smaller, more affordable residential units.

    There are generally 4 main stages of RO/DI filters, but can have as many as 6-8, but really a 4 stage is all that is needed unless you need to target a very specific issue within your water. 

    On average, each of these RO/DI filters are capable of doing 10's of thousands of gallons and last around 6-12 before the filters need to be replaced.  However, if you have a higher TDS, above 200 or other impurities your filters may need to be changed prior to that 6-8 month mark.

     

    Stage 1: Sediment

     

    sedimentfilter.png

     

    Sediment Pre-Filters helps protect your RO/DI system from the damaging effects of sediment (dirt & debris) build up. The sediment in city or well water can clog faucets, damage appliances and even change the taste of your drinking water.

    We recommend a 0.5 micron filter for an almost absolute micron rating.

    - Graduated sediment removal
    - Excellent for use in areas with extremely high sediment levels
    - Consistent filtration even at high differential pressures
    - 100% polypropylene construction
    - Cartridge free of surfactants, binders and adhesives

    Here is the difference between & new & used sediment filter, as you can see they pull out A LOT of dirt & debris during the 1st stage!

     

    dirtysediment.JPG

     

    Stage 2: Carbon

     

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    Carbon filtering is a method of filtering that uses a bed of activated carbon to remove contaminants and impurities, using chemical adsorption.

    Each particle/granule of carbon provides a large surface area/pore structure, allowing contaminants the maximum possible exposure to the active sites within the filter media. One pound (454 g) of activated carbon contains a surface area of approximately 100 acres (40 Hectares).

    Activated carbon works via a process called adsorption, whereby pollutant molecules in the fluid to be treated are trapped inside the pore structure of the carbon substrate. Carbon filtering is commonly used for water purification, in air purifiers and industrial gas processing, for example the removal of siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide from biogas.

    We recommend a 0.5 micron size for your carbon filters so that it has the highest adsorption rate possible.

    - Removes chlorine, organics, taste and odor
    - Meet NSF Standards.
    - 0.5uM carbon block filters remove trihalomethanes, low levels of chloramine, pesticides, volatile organic chemicals (VOC's) and 99.95% of giardia and cryptosporidium cysts.

     

    Stage 3: Reverse Osmosis

     

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    Reverse osmosis (RO) is the true workhorse of an RO/DI system and removes the majority of impurites out of your water a water purification technology that uses a semipermeable membrane to remove ions, molecules, and larger particles from drinking water. In reverse osmosis, an applied pressure is used to overcome osmotic pressure, a colligative property, that is driven by chemical potential differences of the solvent, a thermodynamic parameter. Reverse osmosis can remove many types of dissolved and suspended species from water, including bacteria, and is used in both industrial processes and the production of potable water.

    After the RO membrane your TDS should be between 10-30ppm.  To get it to 0 the 4th stage of De-Ionization is required.

     

    Stage 4: De-Ionization

     

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    De-Ionized water (DI) is water that has had almost all of its mineral ions removed, such as cations like sodium, calcium, iron, and copper, and anions such as chloride and sulfate. De-Ionization is a chemical process that uses specially manufactured ion-exchange resins, which exchange hydrogen and hydroxide ions for dissolved minerals, and then recombine to form water. Because most non-particulate water impurities are dissolved salts, De-Ionization produces a high purity water that is generally similar to distilled water, and this process is quick and without scale build up.

    A DI filter will bring your TDS levels down to 0 ppms!

     

    If you follow this rule of always running RO/DI water you will produce some of the highest grade medical cannabis possible!

     

     

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